Kona Coffee’s Unique Ecological & Agronomical Profile

Science has not yet proven why certain soil and exposure sites produce finer coffee than others.  We can only point to certain correlations between quality coffee with certain varieties of carefully processed arabica coffee and with origins that include well-drained volcanic soils, higher elevations, and seasonal tropical wet-and-dry climates. Kona’s coffee-growing belt mimics other coffee-growing…

Coffee Mucilage

BEST PRACTICES: COFFEE MUCILAGE by Nancy Griffith (what I have learned as of Oct 18, 2006) After harvesting and removing the skins [pulping] of coffee cherry, the mucilage needs to be removed from the seed.  The soft and slippery mucilage is actually the fruit of the coffee, as opposed to the skin and the seed. …

Pruning Practices

BEST PRACTICES: PRUNING PRACTICES (Presentation by Bob Smith) Coffee beans form on last year’s growth.  Three years growth on the vertical gives the maximum crop. Remove suckers on bent over verticals Beaumont-Fukunaga prunes every third row to the stump, permitting more space and light and thus better yield per tree.  This works well for new plantings. …

Planting Panel Notes

BEST PRACTICES: PLANTING PRACTICES PANEL NOTES EMPHASIS ON NEW PLANTINGS Sally Rice:  As a “contract coffee farmer,” she works with planting raw land. She uses bulldozers to prepare soil well, she chips organic material, rather than burying it, to avoid pits in a few years when the organic material decays. She fertilizes before she plants…